Sunday, May 20, 2007

The Last Word on New York and On to San Antonio


It turns out that we do live in a very small world so I have one last addendum to finish off my commentary on the trip to New York City last week. I have an uncle, Don Kenney who has been a jazz bass player for many years and was a regular with a Boston group called the New Black Eagle Jazz band until he moved to Florida in 2004. Thursday night, I wanted to email my Uncle Don to tell him about seeing Woody Allen and the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band and I decided to look at the New Black Eagle Jazz Band website while I was writing. Lo and behold, in the “who we are” section, Uncle Don was listed and right below him, so was Jerry Zigmont, the trombone player we met in New York. Apparently Jerry sits in with the Black Eagles from time to time.

I emailed Jerry, via his web site and both Jerry and Uncle Don recalled a very long weekend they both spent at a jazz festival in Laughlin, Nevada one year. Jerry was also kind enough to send me some additional photos of Woody Allen and the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band at the CafĂ© Carlyle, so I’ve included them on this post.



The next three days I will find myself on a business trip to my corporate headquarters in San Antonio, so the posts may be sporadic, but please keep coming back.






4 comments:

Larramie said...

Don't you just love the fact that such "reunions" can take place, Lisa? What a great example of six degrees of separation!

Lisa said...

Larramie,

It's a classic example. I love when things like that happen!

Leslie said...

Your trip sounds wonderful and I'm so glad that it was a dream for you! Fabulous.
--Lez

Lisa said...

Leslie,

It was -- and a belated HAPPY BIRTHDAY to you!

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